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« MPE 2013+ Workshop: IT'S NOT EASY BEING GREEN: Employing Citizen Science to Map Reptile and Amphibian Distributions

MPE 2013+ Workshop: IT'S NOT EASY BEING GREEN: Employing Citizen Science to Map Reptile and Amphibian Distributions

June 17, 2018 - June 19, 2018

Location:

Groton School

Groton, MA

Organizer(s):

David Black, Groton School

Niki Cagle, Duke University

Margaret (Midge) Cozzens, DIMACS

Amphibians and reptiles collectively herpetofauna or "herps" are declining faster than any other group of animals on the planet. Scientists now estimate that one in four of the nation's amphibian and reptile species are at risk of extinction. Many of these species are highly sensitive to temperature fluctuations and associated changes in environmental conditions associated with global warming. All are vulnerable to habitat alteration, particularly that associated with human activities such as deforestation, draining of wetlands, and pollution from agricultural run-off. Between 2002 and 2011, amphibian populations in U.S. habitats disappeared at a rate of 3.7 percent per year, far more widespread and severe than initially feared. In other countries, lizard populations have declined by an average of 75 percent. Reptiles and amphibians are bellwethers of environmental health and their loss from habitats is often a signal that these systems are failing. As climate projections and data vary with location, scientists and policymakers must have access to detailed information about species, their distribution, and the distribution of current and predicted threat processes for the location, in order to design effective and targeted conservation actions. Tools such as Herpmapper, in the hands of citizen scientists, can provide invaluable, high-quality data records on species occurrence, rarity, and distribution, even for species that are difficult to detect. The purpose of the workshop is to gather together experts in mathematics, computer science, environmental science, herpetology, and science education to present the current state of the field, identify opportunities to leverage citizen-science contributed datasets, and improve conservation of reptiles and amphibians. The workshop will promote interdisciplinary approaches and new collaborative efforts to advance the optimal use of citizen science in support of species conservation actions in the face of global change. Funds are available to support travel and lodging. The workshop will meet for dinner Sunday night at the hotel, for a full day on Monday and one-half day on Tuesday. The deadline for applications is April 30, 2018, or until all slots are filled. The workshop is by invitation only.

Please send an email indicating your interest in attending the workshop and the approximate amount you need for travel to mcozzens@dimacs.rutgers.edu or jwojtowi@dimacs.rutgers.edu.

 

Sunday, June 17, 2018

7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Dinner: Great American Grill in hotel

 

Monday, June 18, 2018

7:30 AM - 8:00 AM

Travel to Groton School in Groton MA

8:00 AM - 8:45 AM

Breakfast at Groton School

8:45 AM - 9:15 AM

Welcome & Introductions and Plans for Workshop

David Black, Groton School

Margaret (Midge) Cozzens, DIMACS

9:15 AM - 10:00 AM

Introduction of Herpmapper

Christopher Smith, Herpmapper

10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Break

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM
12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

Lunch at Groton School

1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Continuation of Morning Work with Data

2:30 PM - 3:00 PM

Break

3:00 PM - 5:30 PM
5:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Depart for Dinner

6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

Dinner: Gibbet Hill Grill, 61 Lowell Rd, Groton MA

 

Tuesday, June 19, 2018

7:30 AM - 8:00 AM

Travel to Groton School in Groton MA

8:00 AM - 8:45 AM

Breakfast at Groton School

8:45 AM - 9:00 AM

Question for Discussion Later

9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
10:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Break

10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

Discussion led by Whit Gibbons

Whit Gibbons, University of Georgia

12:30 PM - 12:40 PM

Box Lunches and Departures

 

Call For Participation:

Attendance is by invitation only.